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As good as these posts are, they’re no substitute for legal advice, so we’re happy to have a chat about anything you read here – just get in touch.

Constructive dismissal – an essential guide

Constructive dismissal is one of the most frequent and important topics for legal advice at Springhouse. It is, however, commonly misunderstood. An employee needs to have resigned in order to bring a constructive dismissal claim, and this is naturally a… Read on

What are zero hours contracts?

Zero hours contracts are contracts under which employees or workers agree to work only where the employer makes work available, but there is no certainty that any such work will be made available. Any provision in a zero hours contract… Read on

Study and training rights: what are they?

A legal right to request study or training is given to certain employees. The right only applies to businesses who employee 250 or more people. Furthermore, the training in question needs to relate both to the employee’s own effectiveness, and… Read on

What are Sunday working rights?

Sunday working rights are legal rights given to shop and betting workers. Workers in these industries cannot be forced to work on Sundays, as they are able to ‘opt-in’ or ‘opt-out’ of Sunday working. The rights are given to workers… Read on

Liability for Christmas party assault?

We report on a case where a company boss assaulted an employee after a Christmas party, once the group had returned to their hotel and started indulging in heavy drinking. Was there enough of a connection between the workplace and… Read on

Sex segregation not discriminatory

This case involves the segregation of pupils between the ages of 9 and 16 at a school, in order to reflect an Islamic ethos. Was this discriminatory? Background This was a challenge by the school to an inspection report which… Read on

Final written warning could not be relied on

In this case, brought against the BBC, the Claimant successfully argued that his dismissal had been unfair because the final written warning relied on was “manifestly inappropriate”. This case gives rise to interesting questions about how and when written warnings… Read on

Time for lunch?

The EAT has held that an employer may be deemed to have ‘refused’ to permit rest breaks even if an employee has not expressly requested them. It is enough, simply, where an employer puts in place working arrangements such as… Read on

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