Changes to pension schemes discriminated against younger members

Two recent Employment Appeal Tribunal (EAT) decisions highlight how pension scheme changes can put younger employees at a disadvantage and be discriminatory on the grounds of age.   Background When an employer makes changes to employees’ pension benefits it is… Read on

Are trigger points for sickness absence dismissals lawful?

The latest ruling from the European Court of Justice (ECJ) suggests that intermittent sickness absence thresholds, which allow employers to dismiss staff once a  trigger point has been breached, are potentially discriminatory against disabled employees. Background Many employers operate sickness… Read on

Bullying at work: what can I do about it?

Often staff will not feel confident raising a bullying complaint, particularly if the alleged bully is a manager. But every employer needs to take grievances seriously; individuals should not suffer in silence and need to speak out where they think… Read on

Handling a bullying grievance: dos and dont’s for employers

Dealing with allegations of workplace bullying is always tricky for an employer because bullying can be hard to recognise and hard to define. Read our article in employment solicitor magazine on the dos and dont’s of handling a bullying grievance.… Read on

Employee travel disruption – how to deal with it

As snow and ice continue to cause disruption across the UK, many organisations will be forced to close but what are employers’ rights and obligations in such circumstances? Do we have to pay employees who can’t get into work? An… Read on

Vaping in the workplace: what’s the score?

Smoking in workplaces has been prohibited in England since July 2007- but vaping with e-cigarettes is not covered by the law. Employers can therefore decide whether or not to allow vaping in their workplace. Ideally employers should have a clear… Read on

Monitoring employee email: how far can you go?

We have recently reported on an important European Court of Human Rights decision (Barbulescu) in which the ECHR held that Mr Barbulescu’s emails should not have formed evidence against him during his dismissal for excessive use of personal messaging during… Read on

Whistleblowers – Meaning of ‘public interest’ clarified

The Court of Appeal in Chesterton Global Ltd v Nurmohamed confirms that a complaint by a worker about unlawful conduct committed by the employer which is mostly personally motivated may nevertheless have the protection of the whistleblowing legislation if the… Read on

Sickness whilst on holiday – the current position

One of the most confusing areas of employment law in recent years has concerned the impact of sickness absence on employees’ entitlement to statutory holiday and holiday pay. These issues have been examined at judicial levels from Employment Tribunals to… Read on