Whistleblowers – Meaning of ‘public interest’ clarified

The Court of Appeal in Chesterton Global Ltd v Nurmohamed confirms that a complaint by a worker about unlawful conduct committed by the employer which is mostly personally motivated may nevertheless have the protection of the whistleblowing legislation if the… Read on

Sickness whilst on holiday – the current position

One of the most confusing areas of employment law in recent years has concerned the impact of sickness absence on employees’ entitlement to statutory holiday and holiday pay. These issues have been examined at judicial levels from Employment Tribunals to… Read on

Election 2017: manifesto promises on employment law

Employment rights have figured strongly in the manifestos of the main three political parties. Somewhat surprisingly, the Conservatives are very much a part of a general consensus that employment rights should be expanded. We outline the various commitments. Conservatives Maintain… Read on

Poor attitude constitutes gross misconduct

We report on a further case sanctioning the dismissal of an employee for poor conduct. Background In April 2017, a judgment was handed down by the Court of Appeal in the case of Adeshina v St George’s University Hospitals NHS Read on

Asperger Syndrome: multiple choice was discrimination

Was an applicant with Asperger Syndrome put at a particular disadvantage by a multiple choice test? Was this form of assessment justified? Background We report on a recent decision of the Employment Appeal Tribunal in the case of Government Legal… Read on

Taxation of payments in lieu of notice

In the Finance Bill 2017, the government intends to implement its plans to tax all payments in lieu of notice. There is currently a possible way around this if there was no payment in lieu of notice clause in the… Read on